Open Camera – A Quick Review

I know it’s been a while, but I’m ready to jump back into things now.

** Update: due to the insane amount of spam comments I am receiving on this post I have closed commenting. I hope the article is still useful to you **

The last year has been kinda crazy, but some recent events have put me back into the media side of things. I’m excited to be back. I decided this morning, though, that I would need a better camera than my little 720 camcorder. I know my smartphone has a decent camera, but I wanted more control. Enter a quick Google search, and voila, Manual Camera. Sadly, that app is not compatible with my device (or rather vice versa) so I decided to give Open Camera a try. It’s totally free, they tell me, and has some of the features I was looking for. To determine whether or not this ap is worth my time and storage space, I’ve decided to do a quick side-by-side comparison with a few shots from both the Open Camera app and the standard Camera app that came pre-installed.

Here we go.

Camera

Open Camera

Camera

Open Camera

Camera

Open Camera

Camera

Open Camera

Camera

 

Open Camera

 

The only thing I changed when taking these photos was the focal point. Everything else was automatic. While Open Camera does have better depth of field, I think, it tends to shoot hot. That is easily managed by adjusting exposure. Honestly I am impressed with the default camera’s ability to so accurately choose exposure, thereby shooting a raw image that appears far more rich in color depth.

Now, we all know some fun can be had in post. After some color correction, here is what happened:

The default camera is on the left, Open Camera on the right. I still kinda like the default camera better. (All of the editing was done by the default app on my phone, as well.) Now, for kicks, here is a very similar picture I took roughly one year ago under similar conditions with a DSLR camera (unedited).

So there you go. Rocks and red leaves all go to prove… What, exactly? That the quality of the photo can depend on a number of things to varying degrees. Even the best photographer in the world won’t get far with a crummy camera, but the camera hardly makes the photographer. After a year additional practice, I can take much nicer pictures with my smartphone than with that DSLR. However, color correction is not to be counted out, for if your framing is good it can improve the rest of the image. Again, it depends a lot on how much you know. Basically, I can’t blame my terrible shots on the camera or app at my disposal, and just because someone else has a bajillion dollars to spend on equipment doesn’t mean I can’t still take comparable images, so long as I understand my limitations and skills and keep practicing and practicing and practicing…

I understand I have asked you to look at a lot of crummy photos just now, so here are a few of my favorites to prove I am not terrible. Haha. It’s good to be back.

I have a lot of fun with signs and straight lines and industrial settings, as well as nature.

Fire hydrants are some of my favorite things to photograph. Maybe because they are so easy to skip over.

The focus is a little soft, yeah, but I liked how the light hit the mushroom just so.

Pond scum. This might be my favorite personal photo of all time.

… And more fun with signs.

 

Thanks for reading. If you have any better photos of rocks and red leaves, feel free to leave them in the comments.

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